Would you cook dinner for the kids on these?

By on February 28, 2014
Rusty Brisbane City Council park barbecue.

RATEPAYERS fork out almost $6500 a year to clean and restock 30 of these old, often rusty wood-fired barbecues on the Northside, a Brisbane City Council spokesperson said.

Despite the corrosion, council believed they were safe to cook on and the spokesperson said they’d “never had any complaints to suggest otherwise”.

NorthernLife.com.au put it to council that it was rare to see the 90s-era units being used, to which the spokesperson replied: “Though wood barbecues are not used as much as the electric barbecues, they still provide a valuable service to the community where no electric barbecues are in the vicinity.

“The wood BBQs in the higher-profile areas are used by the community, for example, the Decker Park barbecue on the Sandgate Foreshore is often used for small gatherings.”

Better than nothing, council says

Despite the rust, the old wood-fired barbecues, like this one beside Brickyard Rd, Virginia, are safe to use, council says.

Despite the rust, the old wood-fired barbecues, like this one beside Brickyard Rd, Virginia, are safe to use, council says.

Council was slowly replacing the wood-fired barbecues “as funding becomes available and if the park meets requirements to have an electric barbecue installed”.

“In some cases, a wood barbecue may be the only option for that park due to low usage number,” the spokesperson said.

If council cleared the barbecues of rust, would you use them more?
Tell us below.

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About Nick Moore

Nick Moore is the editor of NorthernLife.com.au. He also edits the printed Great Wait. Nick started as a journalist in 1993 and has worked for Fairfax, News Corp and APN.

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